Wednesday, November 23, 2016

PICKING A DISSENTING VOICE. Trump is reaching out to all parts of the Republican Party, picking South Carolina Governor Nikki Haley as his ambassador to the United Nations
Haley, who is the daughter of Indian immigrants, has already carved out a legacy for herself, serving as her home state's first female and first minority governor.
Once considered a potential vice president pick, Trump's tapping of Haley, 44, further raises the profile of a rising star in a party whose leaders are increasingly attempting to attract more minorities and women.
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Rep. Sean Duffy said Wednesday that the fact that Trump is even considering Haley after her criticism of the President-elect speaks highly of him.

"I think it's quite remarkable that he's looking for talent and not trying to settle old scores," the Wisconsin Republican told CNN's Chris Cuomo on "New Day."

Trump said in January that Haley's stance on immigration was "weak" after the South Carolina governor welcomed properly vetted legal immigrants into her state, regardless of race or religion. He also tweeted in March, "The people of South Carolina are embarrassed by Nikki Haley!"

Haley went as far to say that Trump represents "everything a governor doesn't want in a president."

"I want someone who is going to hold Republicans accountable, and I want someone who is going to make a difference, not just for our party but for every person they represent in the country," she told reporters in February.
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The governor has long been a rising star in the GOP and was endorsed by former Republican Gov. Sarah Palin during her gubernatorial run. But Haley came to national -- and international -- attention following the Charleston church shooting in 2015, where a self-proclaimed white supremacist opened fire on a Bible study group at a predominantly black church, killing nine people.

Haley became a highly visible presence in the days following the tragedy -- particularly in the highly contentious battle to remove the Confederate Flag from the state Capitol grounds.

"These grounds are a place that everybody should feel a part of," she said at the time. "What I realized now more than ever is people were driving by and felt hurt and pain. No one should feel pain."

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